PTR Record

Record PTR

PTR record and reverse DNS are used by e-mail servers to verify the authenticity of the sender by correctly setting the reverse DNS resolution of a domain, thus making it possible to verify the trustworthiness of the sender server and preventing his e-mails from being considered Spam PTR record - BLOG I.T.

It seems complicated to understand the operation of the PTR record but for those who manage, even in a simplistic way, a DNS server or are put in a position of having to configure it for a domain that will manage an email server, the creation of a PTR record will be basic and will prevent the emails sent from that server from being marked as Spam even though they are not.

Many people have tried, correctly, to generate DMARC, DKIM and configure the string of the TXT SPF record, failing to understand why the servers receiving the e-mails were still marking them as Spam.

The reason is very simple, the PTR record was missing or it was badly configured or the manager providing the Internet line did not know how to configure it correctly by linking the static IP assigned to you with the name of the mail server that will have to operate to send the e-mails.

Certainly, because the PTR record is not related to the e-mails that are received by the server, but is related to the SMTP protocol and it is useless to think of using SMTPS, i.e. certified sending, because it would change absolutely nothing.

We must bear in mind that when we generate an A record in our DNS server, there is an association between our IP and the service that we are going to serve.

For example, to serve a server that has to display an Internet site, whether it is hosted on Apache, on Microsoft’s II Server or on another HTTP server, we must associate in the A record the IP that the Internet manager has assigned to us statically and NOT dynamically, this is also important for the PTR record.

Here is a quick example:

21.64.115.96 pippo.it
21.64.115.96 www.pippo.it

This is how we need to configure the A record for the domain name Pippo.IT to allow someone who wants to visit that website to view it on their browser.

In practice, a DNS server performs a numerical humanisation operation, i.e. instead of writing the IP address of Pippo.IT, it associates it with a mnemonic name (easier to remember) to allow a human being to reach the pages of the site that interest him, the same thing can be said for the PTR record, even if it has a particular format that distinguishes it: static IP + in-addr.arpa associated with a domain name.

This is a very simplistic explanation, but in practice this is what happens at a basic level even for the PTR record, then there are configuration techniques such as TTL (Time to Live) with a value of 86400, which is equivalent to 86400 seconds = 1 day.

Any record we are going to register in our DNS server will have a value that will make navigation more or less fast since we will not need to check every time if the IP has changed and we will lighten the work of our authoritative server.

We’ll stop here because otherwise we’ll go off topic and at the moment we’re talking about the PTR record related to Spam issues.

To write a PTR record we have to take our IP address and turn it completely upside down, so if we have:

21.64.115.96 as a static IP address assigned by our internet provider, we will have to write 93.115.64.21-in.addr.arpa and as a record type we will choose PTR with the association of a domain that in our case we have defined as PIPPO.IT but……it will be better to address it to smtp.pippo.it in order to have already ready the way to correctly configure our mail server.

The PTR record is of fundamental importance in order to avoid ending up among spammers, in fact there are organisations worldwide that record presumed or real Spam operations to which many servers refer and immediately discard incoming emails without even getting them to the recipient.

Email servers use reverse DNS resolution (rDNS), which allows them to verify the domain name and authority of that server to forward emails.

Many providers who host websites, because of the spam that many have used for unwanted newsletters or unintentional emailing caused by viruses or other, have stopped making their email servers available and only host the website to avoid being marked as a spammer and do not allow the customer to use their PTR record under penalty of having their hosting provision terminated.

Once our PTR record has been correctly configured and we have asked our Internet manager for the link between the static IP assigned and the mnemonic identification address (smtp.pippo.it), we will just have to wait a few days and then we can check, thanks to a Google search, whether everything has become linearly operational.

All we have to do is type in “reverse DNS” and click on one of the many websites that allow online DNS verification.

Otherwise, we can use a GNU/Linux operating system where, thanks to the command “dig”, we can verify the exact same thing:

dig -x 21.64.115.96

The result should be similar to this and will allow you to understand if the PTR record and your Internet provider have started working correctly.

;; <<>> DiG 9.11.3-1ubuntu1.15-Ubuntu <<>> -x 21.64.115.96
;; global options: +cmd
;; Got answer:
;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 44730
;;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 1

;; OPT PSEUDOSECTION:
; EDNS: version: 0, flags:; udp: 65494
;; QUESTION SECTION:
;96.115.64.21.in-addr.arpa. IN PTR

;; ANSWER SECTION:
96.115.64.21.in-addr.arpa. 86400 IN PTR smtp.pippo.it.¬† ¬† <——– Here’s what should appear with a correct PTR record

;; Query time: 207 msec
;; SERVER: 127.0.0.53#53(127.0.0.53)
;; WHEN: Wed Jun 16 17:06:58 CEST 2021
;; MSG SIZE rcvd: 8

Or we can use another command that is usually easier to remember:

nslookup 21.64.115.96
96.115.64.21.in-addr.arpa name = smtp.pippo.it <——– Here is what should appear with a correct PTR record

Authoritative answers can be found from:

We now know how important the correct creation of a PTR record can be in order not to end up with spam domains.

We should always remember to set SPF, DKIM and DMARC records as well to increase the credibility of our mail server and its reputation as well as having a near certainty that our emails will not end up destroyed or placed in a recipient’s spam folder.

Record PTR - BLOG I.T.

Record PTR

Record PTRI record PTR ed il reverse DNS vengono utilizzati dai server di posta elettronica per verificare l’autenticit√† del mittente impostando correttamente la risoluzione inversa DNS di un dominio consentendo di verificare l’attendibilit√† del server mittente ed evitando che le sue email vengano considerate Spam¬†Record PTR - Blog I.T.

Sembra complicato comprendere il funzionamento del record PTR ma per coloro che gestiscono, anche in maniera semplicistica, un server DNS o sono messi in condizione di doverlo configurare per un dominio che dovrà gestire un server di posta elettronca, la creazione di un record PTR sarà basilare ed eviterà che le email che verranno inviate da quel server vengano contrassegnate come Spam pur non essendolo.

In molti si sono cimentati, correttamente, nella generazione del DMARC, del DKIM e nella configurazione della stringa del record TXT SPF non riuscendo a comprendere come mai i server che ricevevano la posta elettronica effettuavano comunque una marchiatura Spam.

Il motivo √® semplicissimo, mancava il record PTR o era mal configurato o il gestore che fornisce la linea internet non ha saputo configurarlo correttamente legando con la risoluzione contraria l’IP statico che vi ha assegnato con il nome del mail server che dovr√† operare per l’invio delle email.

Certamente, perch√® il record PTR non √® messo in relazione con la posta elettronica che viene ricevuta dal server, ma viene messo in relazione con il protocollo SMTP ed √® inutile anche pensare di poter utilizzare SMTPS e cio√® l’invio certificato in quanto non cambierebbe assolutamente niente.

Dobbiamo avere presente che quando generiamo un record A nel nostro server DNS, avviene un’associazione tra il nostro IP ed il servizio che andremo a servire.

Ad esempio, per servire un server che deve visualizzare un sito internet, sia che sia ospitato su Apache che su II Server della Microsoft o su altro server HTTP, dovremo associare nel record A l’IP che il gestore internet ci ha assegnato in modo statico e NON in modo dinamico, questo √® importante anche per il record PTR.

Ecco un esempio rapido:

21.64.115.96   pippo.it
21.64.115.96  www.pippo.it

Ecco il modo con il quale dobbiamo configurare il record A per il nome a dominio Pippo.IT per consentire a chi intende visitare quel sito internet di visualizzarlo sul proprio browser.

Un server DNS in pratica compie un’operazione di umanizzazione numerica e cio√® ci consente invece di scrivere l’indirizzo IP di Pippo.IT, di associarlo ad un nome mnemonico (pi√Ļ facile da ricordare) per consentire ad un essere umano di poter raggiungere le pagine del sito che gli interessano, stessa cosa si pu√≤ dire per il record PTR anche se ha un formato particolare che lo contraddistingue: IP statico + in-addr.arpa associato ad un nome a dominio.

E’ molto semplicistica come spiegazione ma in pratica √® ci√≤ che avviene a livello base anche per il record PTR, poi esistono tecniche di configurazione come il TTL ¬†(Time to Live) con un valore 86400 , che equivale a 86400 secondi = 1 giorno.

Qualsiasi record andremo a registrare nel nostro server DNS avr√† un valore che render√† la navigazione pi√Ļ o meno veloce in quanto non necessiteremo di dover verificare ogni volta se l’IP √® cambiato ed alleggeriremo il lavoro del nostro server autoritativo.

Ci fermiamo quì perchè altrimenti andiamo fuori tema ed al momento stiamo parlando del record PTR legato alle problematiche di Spam.

Per scrivere un record PTR dobbiamo prendere il nostro indirizzo IP e ribaltarlo completamente, quindi se avremo:

21.64.115.96 come IP address statico assegnato dal nostro gestore internet, dovremo scrivere 93.115.64.21-in.addr.arpa e come tipologia di record sceglieremo proprio PTR con l’associazione di un dominio che nel nostro caso abbiamo definito come PIPPO.IT ma……sar√† meglio indirizzarlo a smtp.pippo.it in modo da avere gi√† pronta la strada per poter configurare correttamente il nostro server di posta elettronica.

Il record PTR è di fondamentale importanza per evitare di finire tra gli spammer, infatti esistono delle organizzazioni a livello mondiale, che registrano le operazioni di presunto o reale Spam a cui moltissimi server fanno riferimento e scartano immediatamente le email in ricezione senza neanche farle pervenire al destinatario.

I server di posta elettronica utilizzano una risoluzione inversa DNS (rDNS) che gli consente di verificare il nome a dominio e l’autorit√† di tale server all’inoltro di email.

Molti provider che ospitano i siti internet, a causa dello Spam che molti hanno utilizzato per newsletter non desiderate o invio di email involontario causato da virus o altro, hanno smesso di mettere a disposizione i loro server email ed ospitano solamente il sito internet proprio per evitare di venire contrassegnati come spammer e non consentono al cliente l’utilizzo del record PTR di loro appartenenza a pena della chiusura della fornitura di hosting.

Una volta configurato correttamente il nostro record PTR ed aver fatto richiesta al nostro gestore internet per il legame tra l’IP statico assegnato e l’indirizzo identificativo mnemonico (smtp.pippo.it) dovremo solo attendere qualche giorno per poi poter verificare grazie ad una ricerca Google, se il tutto √® diventato linearmente operativo.

Sar√† sufficiente scrivere “reverse DNS” per cliccare su uno dei tati siti internet che consentono la verifica dell’ rDNS online.

Altrimenti potremo utilizzare un sistema operativo GNU/Linux dove grazie al comando “dig”, potremo verificare la stessa identica cosa:

dig -x 21.64.115.96

Il risultato dovrà essere simile a questo e vi consentirà di comprendere se il record PTR ed il vostro gestore internet hanno iniziato a lavorare correttamente.

; <<>> DiG 9.11.3-1ubuntu1.15-Ubuntu <<>> -x 21.64.115.96
;; global options: +cmd
;; Got answer:
;; ->>HEADER<<- opcode: QUERY, status: NOERROR, id: 44730
;; flags: qr rd ra; QUERY: 1, ANSWER: 1, AUTHORITY: 0, ADDITIONAL: 1

;; OPT PSEUDOSECTION:
; EDNS: version: 0, flags:; udp: 65494
;; QUESTION SECTION:
;96.115.64.21.in-addr.arpa. IN PTR

;; ANSWER SECTION:
96.115.64.21.in-addr.arpa. 86400 IN PTR smtp.pippo.it.¬† ¬† <——–¬† Ecco ci√≤ che dovrebbe comparire con un record PTR corretto

;; Query time: 207 msec
;; SERVER: 127.0.0.53#53(127.0.0.53)
;; WHEN: Wed Jun 16 17:06:58 CEST 2021
;; MSG SIZE rcvd: 8

Oppure potremo utilizzare un altro comando solitamente pi√Ļ semplice da ricordare:

nslookup 21.64.115.96
96.115.64.21.in-addr.arpa name = smtp.pippo.it¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† <——–¬† Ecco ci√≤ che dovrebbe comparire con un record PTR corretto

Authoritative answers can be found from:

 

Adesso sappiamo quanto possa essere importante la creazione corretta di un record PTR per non finire tra di domini spam.

Dovremo sempre ricordarci di settare anche i record SPF, DKIM e DMARC per aumentare la credibilità del nostro server di posta elettronica e la sua reputazione oltre che avere una quasi certezza che le nostre email non finiranno distrutte o inserite in una cartella Spam del destinatario.
Record PTR - BLOG I.T.